Driveway Granted For Airport Road Property

Council Chambers at the Old Wesleyan Chapel

Planning permission has been granted to create a driveway and parking area for a property on the road to the airport.

However, there were concerns from Councillors about the loss of elm trees and further development that might take place if the application was successful

The proposal is to place a 7m wide opening to the currently unoccupied bungalow, Sunwood, from High Cross Lane, the narrow and busy route to the airport from Old Town Road.

This would also create a passing place for vehicles on the hill, a point picked up by many Councillors as being welcome on this route although Chief Planning Officer, Craig Dryden, suggested they should go back to the applicants with a condition that the opening be made wider, to allow a safer entrance to the site.

Councillor Chris Savill supported this, saying it “needs to be done properly and the width correct.”

However, Councillor David Pearson alleged that this was a “piecemeal part of what will be a wider development” and that there were plans to knock the building down and rebuild it.

He said the site is on a “very dangerous corner” and they should be looking at the land the building sits on “as a whole.”

Craig told Councillors that the building was in urgent need of repair and, if this was to happen, then there would need to be parking for vans and skips off the main road. There is currently no parking space for vehicles outside the property.

Planning Committee Chair, Amanda Martin echoed these points, saying without proper access, the property is condemned to dereliction.

She also said that, while she would not normally be happy with the removal of elm trees, after visiting the site it was evident that the ones there were unhealthy with exposed roots sticking out of the raised hedge.

Another condition of planning was to place a mirror on the bend opposite the house to allow vehicles to exit safely.

 



One Response to Driveway Granted For Airport Road Property

  1. Mark Prebble November 24, 2011 at 9:26 am

    Elm trees are an integral part of our landscape and exposed roots do not indicate an unhealthy tree. What they do indicate is a poorly maintained hedge with the facing stone loose and missing. These hedges are also an important feature that contribute to the view as a whole. The continual degradation and removal of chunks of them is another example of the complacency many of us hold with regard to the fragile landscape of St Mary’s.